Thermocouple

In electronics, thermocouples are a widely used kind of temperature sensor. They are cheap, interchangeable, have standard connectors and can measure a wide range of temperatures. The main limitation is accuracy, system errors of less than 1 °C can be difficult to achieve.

How they work:

In 1822, an Estonian physician named Thomas Seebeck discovered (accidentally) that the junction between two metals generates a voltage which is a function of temperature. Thermocouples rely on this discovery, the so-called Seebeck effect. Although almost any two types of metal can be used to make a thermocouple, a number of standard types are used because they possess predictable output voltages and large temperature gradients.

Standard tables show the voltage produced by thermocouples at any given temperature, so for example in the above diagram, the K type thermocouple at 300 °C will produce 12.2 mV. Unfortunately it is not possible to simply connect up a voltmeter to the thermocouple to measure this voltage, because the connection of the voltmeter leads will make a second, undesired thermocouple junction. To make accurate measurements, this must be compensated for by using a technique known as cold junction compensation (CJC). In case you are wondering why connecting a voltmeter to a thermocouple does not make several additional thermocouple junctions (leads connecting to the thermocouple, leads to the meter, inside the meter etc), the law of intermediate metals states that a third metal, inserted between the two dissimilar metals of a thermocouple junction will have no effect provided that the two junctions are at the same temperature. This law is also important in the construction of thermocouple junctions. It is acceptable to make a thermocouple junction by soldering the two metals together as the solder will not affect the reading. In practice, however, thermocouples junctions are made by welding the two metals together (usually by capacitive discharge) as this ensures that the performance is not limited by the melting point of a solder.

All standard thermocouple tables allow for this second thermocouple junction by assuming that it is kept at exactly zero degrees Celsius. Traditionally this was done with a carefully constructed ice bath (hence the term 'cold' junction compensation). Maintaining an ice bath is not practical for most measurement applications, so instead the actual temperature at the point of connection of the thermocouple wires to the measuring instrument is recorded.

Typically cold junction temperature is sensed by a precision thermistor in good thermal contact with the input connectors of the measuring instrument. This second temperature reading, along with the reading from the thermocouple itself is used by the measuring instrument to calculate the true temperature at the thermocouple tip. For less critical applications, the CJC is performed by a semiconductor temperature sensor. By combining the signal from this semiconductor with the signal from the thermocouple, the correct reading can be obtained without the need or expense to record two temperatures. Understanding of cold junction compensation is important; any error in the measurement of cold junction temperature will lead to the same error in the measured temperature from the thermocouple tip.

Thermocouples are available either as bare wire 'bead' thermocouples which offer low cost and fast response times, or built into probes. A wide variety of probes are available, suitable for different measuring applications (industrial, scientific, food temperature, medical research etc). One word of warning: when selecting probes take care to ensure they have the correct type of connector. The two common types of connector are 'standard' with round pins and 'miniature' with flat pins, this causes some confusion as 'miniature' connectors are more popular than 'standard' types.

Types of thermocouples

When choosing a thermocouple consideration should be given to both the thermocouple type, insulation and probe construction. All of these will have an effect on the measurable temperature range, accuracy and reliability of the readings. Listed below is our (somewhat subjective) guide to thermocouple types.

Type K (Chromel (Ni-Cr alloy) / Alumel (Ni-Al alloy))

Type K is the 'general purpose' thermocouple. It is low cost and, owing to its popularity, it is available in a wide variety of probes. Thermocouples are available in the −200 °C to +1200 °C range. Sensitivity is approx 41µV/°C. Use type K unless you have a good reason not to.

Type E (Chromel / Constantan (Cu-Ni alloy))

Type E has a high output (68 µV/°C) which makes it well suited to low temperature (cryogenic) use. Another property is that it is non-magnetic.

Type J (Iron / Constantan)

Limited range (−40 to +750 °C) makes type J less popular than type K. The main application is with old equipment that can not accept 'modern' thermocouples. J types should not be used above 760 °C as an abrupt magnetic transformation will cause permanent decalibration.

Type N (Nicrosil (Ni-Cr-Si alloy) / Nisil (Ni-Si alloy))

High stability and resistancei to high temperature oxidation makes type N suitable for high temperature measurements without the cost of platinum (B,R,S) types. Designed to be an 'improved' type K, it is becoming more popular.

Thermocouple types B, R and S are all 'noble' metal thermocouples and exhibit similar characteristics. They are the most stable of all thermocouples, but due to their low sensitivity (approx 10 µV/°C) they are usually only used for high temperature measurement (>300 °C).

Type B (Platinum-Rhodium/Pt-Rh)

Suited for high temperature measurements up to 1800 °C. Unusually type B thermocouples (due to the shape of their temperature / voltage curve) give the same output at 0 °C and 42 °C. This makes them useless below 50 °C.

Type R (Platinum / Rhodium)

Suited for high temperature measurements up to 1600 °C. Low sensitivity (10 µV/°C) and high cost makes them unsuitable for general purpose use.

Type S (Platinum / Rhodium)


Suited for high temperature measurements up to 1600 °C. Low sensitivity (10 µV/°C) and high cost makes them unsuitable for general purpose use. Due to its high stability type S is used as the standard of calibration for the melting point of gold (1064.43 °C).

T-type thermocouple Definition: A thermocouple best suited for measurements in the −200 to 0 degree Celsius range. The positive conductor is made of copper, and the negative conductor is made of constantan.